Stegzy's Music Project

A commentary on Stegzy's album collection

Hormonally Yours – Shakespear’s Sister [#590]

ShakespearsSisterHormonallyYoursalbumcoverIn a time when many still missed the polka dot skirted weirdness of Strawberry Switchblade and were adjusting to the gothness of Robert Smith’s Cure while still enjoying on the sly, a little bit of Bananarama, along came a duo of musicians as if to answer that call.

Shakespear’s Sister, that band with the woman from Bananarama (Siobhan Fahey) and that scary looking American woman looking like a cross between Cruella De Ville and Elvira, Mistress of the Dark  (Marcella Detroit), last appeared on this Music Project at #172 with their “best of” compilation, which, as the band had only released about two albums anyway, pretty features the songs of this their second album.

Highlights from this album include their two “hits” I Don’t Care and Stay With Me. As a spotty youth when this album was doing the rounds, I was drawn to the catchiness of their music which helped me blend in with my contemporaries, but I was still at a stage where I didn’t feel safe stepping out of my musical comfort zone of Yes, The Tubes and Chris Isaak  so I never bought the album at the time of release. Indeed, it wasn’t until much later that I plucked up the courage to obtain this album and their “Best of” an action, I suppose, that was done purely out of nostalgia.

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Hit Factory: Pete Waterman’s Greatest Hits – Various Artists [#587]

Screen Shot 2017-06-10 at 11.33.40.pngBack in the eighties and nineties, when he wasn’t that wrinkly dude off the talentless shows on a Saturday night, Pete Waterman was a successful record producer. Polluting the airwaves with hideous plastic pop.

Of course, growing up in the eighties meant that hideous plastic pop was de rigour and many of the songs played at family occasions and parties came from the Hit Factory stable. It is difficult to not listen to examples of this music without being transported back in time thirty years to a wedding or school disco, where teenage hormones raged and lessons in social interaction began.

Hit Factory features artists such as Kylie Minogue, Jason Donovan, Mel & Kim, Steps and 2Unlimited. It is truely dreadful. And yet, I believe that everyone’s record collection should contain at least one example of youthfully contemporaneous music. That way our memories persist and from our memories, we learn and develop.  Indeed, many of the artists featured have either returned to obscurity or seen sense and improved without the Stock Aitkin Waterman interference in their art.

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